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Summer's "100 Deadliest Days" a dangerous time to be on the road

When high school classes end for the year and teenagers start making their way to the streets and highways across Colorado, the number of car crashes involving teenage drivers increases as a result. So, too, does the number of fatal car wrecks involving drivers from this age group, which is bad news for you and everyone else on the roadway.

In fact, the influx of teenagers who drive the state's and nation's roads during the stretch of time between Memorial Day and Labor Day makes driving during this time so dangerous that it became known as summer's "100 Deadliest Days." Regardless of when they are on the road, teenagers lack experience, making them more prone to crashes than older drivers. However, with so many inexperienced teenagers traveling the roads at the same time during the summer months, this period becomes a particularly dangerous one for all drivers and passengers. Just how much more dangerous is it to drive during summer's 100 Deadliest Days?

Sobering statistics

According to AAA, there are about 10 road fatalities every day in the United States throughout the 100 Deadliest Days of summer, which marks a 14% increase over the number of road fatalities seen throughout the rest of the year. In 2016, more than 1,000 people lost their lives in crashes with teenage drivers during this span, shining a spotlight on a need for increased education about the dangers associated with teen driving.

For example, while teenage drivers can struggle under virtually any type of condition simply because they lack the experience older drivers have, driving at night appears to be especially dangerous for them. The number of daily after-dark crashes involving teenagers climbs 22% during summer's 100 Deadliest Days, with close to 40% of all fatal teenager-involved wrecks happening after 9 p.m. and before 5 a.m.

If you are the parent of a teen driver, do not underestimate the importance of educating him or her about the dangers associated with driving. Some teenage drivers also throw alcohol, substance abuse or distracted driving into the mix, which can make them even more dangerous to the motoring public.

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