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Brain Injury Archives

Study examines surgery on elderly patients with brain injuries

As Colorado citizens grow older, the increased risk of falls brings with it an increased risk of brain injury. Brain injury is often treated with surgery, but this is generally not recommended for elderly patients due to a low chance of survival. A 2015 study, however, indicates that the success of surgical treatment for subdural hematoma on patients over the age of 75 depends largely on the condition of the patient prior to the injury.

Mild brain injury symptoms often missed

While most Colorado residents have probably heard about the effects of serious brain injuries, many people don't realize that even a mild concussion can leave a lasting impact. One of the most dangerous things about concussions is that a lot of people who have them don't realize how they have been affected since the head injury occurred.

The dangers of head injuries in cheerleading

Cheerleaders in Colorado and other states might have to fight for their right to be recognized as athletes, but cheerleading requires fit, flexible individuals who are ready to practice frequently and compete in intense environments without the same protective gear football or baseball players use. These athletes forgo things like helmets and padding even though cheerleading can cause concussions, brain injuries and skull fractures.

New research into the cause of TBI

Traumatic brain injury victims in Colorado might be interested in learning more about the some of the potential causes, as described by recent research studies. The University of Maryland School of Medicine claims that the causes of chronic brain degeneration and the nature of TBI have been largely misunderstood up until now. The neurologist and assistant professor of anesthesiology who led the study concluded that long-term inflammation in the brain may be the primary cause of the neuropsychiatric and chronic brain damage issues associated with TBI.

MRI shows hemorrhage from traumatic brain injury

As some Colorado residents may know, traumatic brain injuries affect approximately 1.7 million people each year, and many of them are military members serving in combat zones. Being able to adequately diagnose such an injury soon after it occurs helps in treatment and in getting the ancillary care the individual may need.

Traumatic brain injuries linked to ADHD

It is no secret that a traumatic brain injury can lead to a variety of health issues at the time of the injury and for a long time afterward. A study that was published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research might interest adults in Colorado who have suffered a TBI or know a person who has suffered one.

Researchers identify blood protein linked to brain injuries

When someone in Colorado goes to an emergency room with head trauma, a physician will normally perform a CT scan to look for bleeding in the brain. If no bleeding is apparent, the person will be sent home. As some head trauma victims know, however, everything may not be fine. Brain injuries can inflict headaches, muscle weakness, poor memory, coma and other symptoms for weeks and months.

Potential treatment for concusssions

Colorado residents may want to hear about a new pharmaceutical drug that reportedly has the potential to protect football players and others from suffering brain damage. Researchers have discovered that a drug could be developed from an experimental treatment that was used to restore normal brain functions and structure to mice that had suffered a severe concussion. The focal point of recent concussion news has been football players and boxers diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a progressive neurodegenerative disease resulting from repeated head trauma.

Pediatric brain injuries in Colorado

Researchers have recently discovered that the recovery time for children with brain injuries often has less to do with the severity of the trauma to the head and more to do with the extent of the damage to the coating around the nerves of the cranium. In fact, children and teens who showed myelin sheath damage consistently scored lower on cognitive tests than subjects who had not suffered any type of head injury.

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